Astoria Schools Senior HIgh Guidance

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

In order to receive a diploma from Astoria High School, a student must meet the requirements of the State of Illinois and the following requirements established by the Astoria C.U.S.D. # 1 Board of Education:

            REQUIRED COURSES or CREDITS

            3 credits in English

            2 credits in Science (must include general science and/or biology)

            2 credits in Math (business math may be substituted for 1 math credit)

            1 credit in U.S. History I (including state and federal constitutions)

            1 credit in U.S. History II

            1/2 credit in Consumer Education (or pass state proficiency test)

            1/2 credit in Health

            1/2 credit in Driver Education (30 clock hours of instruction)

            1 credit in Art, Music, Foreign Language or a Vocational Subject

            Physical Education each year (1 credit per year may be earned)

12.5 credits in electives

         

Total credits needed to graduate:  28

MINIMUM LOAD

Students shall register for a minimum of seven (7) classes per semester plus physical education unless permission has been granted by the principal.  Students who are enrolled for the fifth year in high school may register for the courses and/or credits required for graduation and attend school part-time with administrative approval. 

ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMS AND CREDITS

Astoria High School students may earn a maximum of two (2) of the credits that the students will specifically need to graduate through Independent Study, Correspondence Courses, or from Institutions of Higher Education as approved by the building principal.  This relates only to students who will otherwise be short credits to graduate or with administrative approval.  Successful completion of a two (2) or three (3) hour college course will be accepted as one-half (1/2) credit.

Requirements for Graduation for Students Attending Project Insight

All students attending Project Insight in Macomb will need to meet these requirements in order to graduate from Project Insight.  If a student is transferred back to Astoria High School, he or she will be treated as a transfer student and requirements will be adjusted accordingly.

4      Credits in English (including Speech in English 2)

2      Credits in Science

2      Credits in Math

1      Credit in US History (includes constitution requirements)

1      Credit in Social Studies

1/2   Credit in Health

1/2  Credit in Driver Education

1/2   Credit in Consumer Education

3      Credits in Physical Education

1      Credit in Vocational

1      Credit in Fine Arts

1/2   Credit Social Behaviors each semester

2      1/2 Credits of Electives

Total Credits Needed to Graduation:  24

RE-ENROLLMENT

Re-enrollment shall be denied to individuals over the age of 16 who have dropped out of school and who could not earn sufficient credits during the normal school year(s) to graduate before his/her 21st birthday.

A failure in a required class will require that class to be repeated which could result in scheduling difficulties.

DRIVER EDUCATION

A student must be at least fifteen (15) years of age (see registration form) and must have passed at least eight (8) semester classes during the previous two (2) semesters before enrolling in Driver Education. ( PE in High School and Junior High nine (9) week courses and Junior High PE will not be considered.)

PROGRAM PLANNING AND COURSE SELECTIONS

Few decisions students make are as important as those concerning their education.  Because of this importance, you are encouraged to plan carefully and to involve those who can help you in making course selections.  The counselor, teachers and administrators are available to assist you. 

Many graduates of Astoria High School continue their education at a community college, a post-secondary vocational training school, or a four-year college or university.  The counselor is available to consult with students and parents regarding the requirements for entry into these schools and the appropriate high school courses that prepare students to meet them. 

Students who plan to enter a college or university need to be aware of admission policies regarding preparatory courses, testing, and rank-in-class.  Students should check the specific entrance requirements of schools they are interested in to be sure to meet those requirements.

In addition to adequate course preparation, most colleges and universities require ACT or SAT test scores for admission.  To be considered for the Illinois State Scholar competition, juniors must take the ACT or SAT in April or June of the junior year.

Students who plan to enter a vocational training school or seek work immediately after graduation should strongly consider completing a vocational program in high school.

All students should prepare a 4-year plan of study as they register for high school.  These will be placed in their Individual Career Plan (ICP) folders.

GUIDANCE

Guidance services are available for every student in the school. These services include assistance with educational planning, interpretation of test results, occupational information, career information, study helps, help with home, school and or social concerns, or any question the student may feel he/she would like to discuss with the counselor.  Information shared with the counselor is confidential.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE STUDENTS

Foreign exchange students should register for a minimum of seven (7) classes including English, and U.S. History I and II.  Courses may be taken on pass/fail if the student wishes to receive an honorary diploma.  Students who wish to receive a regular diploma must meet all of the requirements for graduation established by Astoria C.U.S.D. # 1

COURSE CHANGES, DROPS, AND INCOMPLETES

The selection of proper courses is the responsibility of students and their parents.  We expect that parents will discuss these decisions extensively with their son(s) and/or daughter(s) before courses are selected for the year.  Our counselor, teachers and administrators will be happy to answer any questions parents and/or students may have.

Many decisions are affected by student course selections.  Such things as final course offerings, purchases of textbooks and materials, class sizes, etc. are determined by the registration process.  Therefore, after final registration in May, NO class changes will be permitted except with the permission of the principal and parent based upon sound educational rationale.

Students are strongly discouraged from dropping courses once registrations have been finalized.   A student who chooses to drop a course after the SECOND WEEK OF A SEMESTER will receive a failing grade ("WF") for the semester unless approved by the principal based upon exceptional circumstances.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Improving the preparation of students for success in college, increasing the number of potential students who are appropriately prepared for baccalaureate studies, and expanding the choices of programs and majors that are available to college-bound students are major goals for both secondary and postsecondary education in Illinois.

In 1985, the Board of Higher Education adopted the following minimum high school subject requirements for admission to public universities and to baccalaureate transfer programs at community colleges:

Four years of English (emphasizing written and oral communications and literature).  Three years of social studies (emphasizing history and government).  Three years of mathematics (introductory through advanced algebra, geometry, trigonometry, or fundamentals of computer programming).   Three years of the sciences (biology, chemistry, 3rd lab science).  Two years in foreign language, music, art or vocational classes. These MINIMUM admission requirements, totaling 15 units of high school coursework, went into effect for freshmen entering Illinois public universities and baccalaureate transfer programs at community colleges in the fall of 1993.  It should be noted that some universities may introduce their own subject pattern requirements which MAY BE HIGHER than the minimums listed above.

GRADING AND REPORTING

Report cards are issued at the end of each nine (9) week grading period.  Letter grades will be given along with the actual percentage grade.  The following scale will be followed to compute grade point averages (GPA):

                        Percentage                  Grade                         Grade Point Value

                        90-100                            A                                          4.00

                        80-89                              B                                          3.00

                        70-79                              C                                          2.00

                        60-69                              D                                          1.00

                        59 & below                     F                                           0.00

                                                               WF                                       0.00

D/F notices are mailed to parents of students who are experiencing difficulties in a class.  These are normally mailed home between the 4th and 5th week of each grading period, but may be sent at any time by a teacher.  Parents must be notified of a possible failure for a nine (9) week or semester grading period at least two (2) weeks prior to the end of the grading period. Grades are available on a day to day basis through Powerschoolwith user ID and password.

Incompletes are removable, but must be made up within ten school days following the grading period for which they were received.  Any incomplete NOT removed during this time becomes a failure ("F") unless the building principal approves of other arrangements in advance.

HONOR ROLL

In order to be listed on the honor rolls, a student must meet the following requirements:

High Honor Roll -- 3.833- 4.0    Honor Roll -- 3.333 - 3.832    Honorable Mention -- 3.0 -- 3.332

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY

The Astoria High School chapter of the National Honor Society is the Sapian chapter.  To be eligible for membership consideration, students must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.  Potential members must also meet high standards of leadership, service and character.  Students who meet the GPA requirements and are sophomores, juniors or seniors in high school are evaluated by a five-member faculty council appointed by the principal. 

Leadership is based on the student's participation in community or school activities, or work as an officer.  To meet the service requirement, the student must have been active in two or more service projects in the school and community.  Character is measured in terms of integrity, behavior, ethics, and cooperation with both students and faculty.

Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors who meet the GPA requirement are given Student Activity Information Forms to fill out in order to assist the faculty council.  Selection to the NHS is a high honor and careful consideration is given to each prospective member.

LOCAL SCHOLARSHIPS

Astoria High School graduates are fortunate to have a number of local scholarships for which they may apply.  The following scholarships are those known to be available to students. 

Jan Jones Memorial Scholarship:  A $100 scholarship will be given to a college bound student who is majoring in math or a math related career, and who has completed four (4) years of high school math with at least a "B" average in math. 

Harry S. and Naomi L. Danner Miller Scholarship:  One (1) or more  renewable scholarships will be awarded each year to graduating college bound seniors who have financial need and are considered likely to make a favorable contribution to the community in the future.  Seniors must complete an application to be considered for this scholarship.  Recipients are selected by a committee composed of the principal, counselor and superintendent.

The Wayne and Rosa Mae Pollitt Scholarship Grant:  This scholarship grant is to be awarded to the graduating senior determined by his/her teachers and the appropriate school officials to be the best student in his/her class in mathematics.  Should the top student in mathematics for the graduating class decide not to attend an institution of higher learning, the scholarship grant money will roll over to make a larger amount to be awarded the following year. 

Parent/Teacher Organization:  A $100 scholarship is awarded annually to the highest-ranking male and female students in the graduating class.

Vermont/Ipava Masonic Scholarship: One male and one female graduating senior from Astoria receives a $200 scholarship.  Students must complete an application. 

Student Council Scholarship: A $500 scholarship is awarded annually to a graduating senior.  Students must complete an application.

Educational Assistance Class of “55 Award: Three $500 awards are provided to graduating seniors by a local donor.  An application is required.

Don Johnson Memorial Scholarship to WIU: One award - $1000 for a year will be applied to the student’s account at WIU.  Selection is to be based upon financial need, leadership, and service.

DISTRICT STUDENT ASSESSMENT PROGRAM

The Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE) will be given to all Juniors near the end of April.  The PSAE is the statewide achievement test for all grade 11 students.  The PSAE will test reading, writing, mathematics, science, and social science.  The test includes the ACT assessment, Work Keys tests and ISBE developed test over a two day period. 

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is administered to all sophomores and to juniors and seniors on a voluntary basis in November or December.  This test meets the requirements for vocational testing as mandated by the state at no cost to the school or to the student. 

The Consumer Education Proficiency Test is given in January each year.  Any high school student who is NOT enrolled in Consumer Education is eligible to take this test.  Students receiving a high enough score would be exempt from taking Consumer Ed as a senior.

The Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) is offered to college-bound juniors and selected sophomores.  This is the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test for juniors.  Students pay the cost of this test.  Fee waivers are available in the guidance office.

The PLAN Test (formerly the Preliminary ACT) is offered to college-bound sophomores in October.  Students who plan to take the ACT as juniors are strongly encouraged to take this test.  Students pay the cost of the test. 

The ASSET test is offered to seniors who plan to enter a community college after graduation.  This test is required for any student who plans to enter Spoon River College and may be taken at Astoria High School. 

STUDENT RECORDS

In compliance with state and federal law, Astoria C.U.S.D. #1 maintains two (2) sets of student records, a permanent record and a temporary record.

1.  The permanent record shall include: basic identifying information, academic transcripts, attendance record,  accident/health reports, information pertaining to the release of this record, ACT or SAT test scores. 

No other information shall be placed in the permanent record.  The permanent record shall be maintained for at least sixty (60) years after the student has graduated, withdrawn, or transferred from the District.

2.  The temporary record may include: family background information, intelligence/aptitude scores, achievement test results, psychological reports, honors/awards, athletics/activities, disciplinary information, teacher anecdotal records, special education files, information pertaining to release of this record, other relevant information not required to be in the permanent record.

Temporary records shall be reviewed at least every four (4) years, or upon a student's change in attendance centers whichever occurs first, to verify entries and correct inaccurate information.  Temporary records may be destroyed five (5) years following the graduation or permanent withdrawal of a student from the district.  A thirty (30) day notice will be published in the local newspaper, The Astoria South Fulton Argus, prior to the destruction of the temporary record.  The students, parents/guardians shall be given an opportunity, within the thirty (30) days to copy the record and information contained in the temporary record.

In the case of the student with a disability who graduates or permanently withdraws from the District, temporary records which may be of continued assistance to the student shall be maintained for five (5) years and be transferred to the student or to the parents/guardians if the student has succeeded to the rights of the parents/guardians.  The content of the transferred records may relate to the diagnosis and remediation of the student's handicapping condition.  An explanation of the usefulness of the records may be given to the parents/guardians or student by the District's appropriate student personnel services worker.

STUDENT DIRECTORY INFORMATION

Throughout the school year various agencies and organizations request information regarding students.  Among those requesting such information are: colleges and universities, scholarship agencies, military services, businesses wishing to offer graduation gifts, award programs. 

Student directory information may include the student's: name, address, gender, grade level, birthdate and lace,

parents/guardians' names and addresses, information in relation to school sponsored activities, organizations and athletics, period of attendance in school.

Parents/guardians will be notified prior to the release of any student directory information.

Parents/guardians who wish to have all or a portion of directory information pertaining to their student deleted from the student directory must notify the principal by the first Monday in September.

FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY OF RECORDS

Astoria C.U.S.D. #1, Astoria, Illinois, is in full compliance with public law 93-380, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1975, as amended, as well as the Freedom of Information Act of 1984.  All educational records shall be open to inspection and review by parents upon written request to the school principal.  A copy of the full policy on the Rights and Privacy of Records may by obtained from the main office during business hours.

STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

The Astoria Community Unit School District uses a comprehensive grievance procedure to resolve conflicts related to student concerns regardless of the nature of the conflict.  It is the policy of this District that all grievances shall be resolved as quickly as possible and at the lowest step possible.

STEP I: 

The student and/or parent/guardian should discuss the matter with the person(s) directly responsible for the grievance.

STEP II: 

If the grievance is not resolved at Step I, the grievant shall present the grievance in writing within ten (10) days of the time when the grievant should have known of the occurrence of the event giving rise to the grievance to the principal.  The principal shall provide a written response to the grievant within ten (10) days of the receipt of the grievance.

STEP III: 

If the grievance is not resolved at Step II, the grievant may refer the grievance to the Superintendent or official designee within ten (10) days after the receipt of the Step II response.  A meeting between parties will be held within ten (10) days and a written response shall be provided within ten (10) days of the meeting.

STEP IV: 

If the grievant is not satisfied with the disposition of the grievance at Step III, the grievant may submit the grievance to the Board of Education within ten (10) days after receipt of the Superintendent's or official designee's written response.  The Board shall allow the grievant to present his/her case to the Board in executive session at the next regularly scheduled Board meeting provided the Board has at least five (5) days notice of the appeal before said regularly scheduled meeting.  If the Board has less than five (5) days notice of said appeal, the grievance shall be heard at a Special meeting to be called within fifteen (15) days of the filing of said appeal. 

1.   Failure of a grievant to act on any grievance within the prescribed time limits will bar any further appeal.

2.     No reprisals shall be taken by the Board or the administration against a grievant because of his/her participation in a grievance.

3.     All records related to a grievance shall be filed separately from the temporary record file of a student involved. 

4.     If the grievant or representative files any claim or complaint in any forum other than under the grievance procedure, then the Board shall not be required to process the said claim or set of facts through the grievance procedure.

Equal Opportunity:  The Astoria School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or disability.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
AGRICULTURE
Introduction to the Agricultural Industry 1 credit 1 year
Offered to: 9, 10
Prerequisite: None


This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field. Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, agricultural mechanics, agricultural biotechnology, food science technology, environmental science and aquacultural science and technology will be presented. The development of leadership, employability and computer skills will also be taught. Because FFA and Supervised Agricultural Experience Programs (SAEPs) are integral components of this course, students are required to maintain SAEPs and to participate in activities of the FFA organization. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips, and exams.


Agricultural Science
Offered to Grades: 10, 11 1 credit 1 year
Prerequisite: Introduction to the Agricultural Industry


This orientation course builds on the basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to the Agricultural Industry course. Major units of instruction include advanced plant science, soil science, animal science, and agricultural mechanics. Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. The development of leadership, employability and computer skills will also be taught. Because FFA and SAEPs are integral components of this course, students are required to maintain SAEPs and to participate in activities of the FFA organization. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips and exams.


Agricultural Business Management
Offered to grades: 11, 12 1/2 credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: Agricultural Science


This capstone course is designed to develop student skills in the areas of advanced agricultural business procedures, establishment of agricultural businesses, managing the agribusiness, financing the agribusiness, marketing and advertising, sales techniques and strategies, and basic principals of web design. Product knowledge is stressed as it relates to the regional agricultural economic base. Leadership skill development is an integral part of this program and is delivered through career and technical student organization (FFA) activities. Because FFA and SAE are integral components of this course, students are required to maintain SAEP's. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips and exams.


Agricultural Mechanics and Technology 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades 12
Prerequisite: Agricultural Science, Ag Bus. Management


This course will concentrate on expanding the student's knowledge and experiences with agricultural mechanics technologies utilized in the agricultural industry and already in the Basic Agricultural Mechanics problem areas. Units of instruction should provide applications within the following integrated systems: Machinery and Equipment; Environmental/Natural Resources; Structures; Energy; and Industrial Marketing. Examples of units that may be included are Design, Construction, Fabrication, and Maintenance; Welding; Electricity/Electronics; Internal Combustion Engines; Hydraulics; Environmental/Natural Resources Management; and Employability Skills. Microcomputer applications are utilized as they relate to each instructional unit. Because FFA and SAE are integral components of this course, students are encouraged to maintain SAEPs and participate in activities of the FFA organization. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips and exams.


Biological Science Applications in Agriculture(Animal Science)
Offered to Grades 10, 11, 12 1/2 credit 1 semester

Prerequisite: Biology I


Biological Science Applications in Agriculture- Animal Science is a course designed to reinforce and extend students' understanding of science by associating scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of animal agriculture and specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in the animal industry. This one-semester course will deepen your understanding of science as content and as a process through the use of numerous laboratory exercises and experiments. Because the FFA and SAE are integral components of this course, students are encouraged to maintain SAEPs and participate in activities of the FFA organization. Grades will be based on assignments, lab reports, other projects, quizzes and tests.


Biological Science Applications in Agriculture
Plant Science
Offered to Grades: 10,11,12 1/2 credit 1 semester
Prerequisite: Biology I


Biological Science Applications in Agriculture- Plant Science is a course designed to reinforce and
extend student's understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with
relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of plant growth and management
in agriculture and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions. This one
semester course will deepen your understanding of science as content and as a process through the
use of numerous laboratory exercises and experiments. Because FFA and SAE are integral components of
this course, students are encouraged to maintain SAEPs and participate in activities of the FFA
organization. Grades will be based on assignments, lab reports, other projects, quizzes and tests.


Horticulture 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Agriculture Science

This course is designed to give students an in-depth look at all phases of the horticulture industry. During the semester, we will cover soil and other plant growing media's, identifying horticultural plants, propagating horticultural plants, basics of growing horticultural plants in greenhouses and nursery settings and constructing, maintaining and using plant-growing structures used in the horticultural field. We will also cover greenhouse management and have a plant sale in the spring. We will finish in the spring by applying the principles of landscaping. The FFA and student Supervised Agricultural Experience projects are required for this class. Students are evaluated through completion of class projects, homework, participation during labs and field trips exams.


ART


Drawing I 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Basic drawing skills will be studied. Composition, shading and perspective will be the major areas of concentration. Pencil and charcoal used extensively.


Drawing II 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Drawing I


Continued shading problems and more advanced compositions will be studied. Figure drawing will be introduced. Pen and ink, colored pencil and pastels will be introduced.


Drawing III 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grade: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Drawing II


Figure drawing, mixed media drawing. More individualized projects will be stressed with students having more choice in subject matter and media.


Painting I 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Watercolor and introduction of acrylics will be the main media.


Painting II 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Drawing I, Painting I


Acrylics on canvas will be used extensively. Still life and landscapes will be the major subject areas. Oil painting will be introduced and used.


Painting III 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Painting I, II


Acrylics and oils on canvas. Concentration on styles and a more individualized approach to subject matter will be the focus of this course.


Ceramics I 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12 (offered alternating years beginning 1997)
Prerequisite: Drawing I


The focus of this course will be based on the handbuilding techniques.


Ceramics II 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12 (offered alternating years beginning 1999)
Prerequisite: Ceramics I


Projects in this course will consist mainly of more complex handbuilt projects and the introduction of the use of the potters wheel.


Sculpture I 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12 (offered alternating years beginning 1998)
Prerequisite: Drawing I


Assemblages, constructions, carvings, and relief work will be the areas of concentration in this course.


Sculpture II 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12 (offered alternating years beginning 2000)
Prerequisite: Sculpture I


Modeling, kiln firing, mold making, casting and possible welding will be the areas of concentration in this course.


Photography I 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Students must be able to supply a 35mm camera. Introduction of darkroom practices and clinicals. Students will responsible for purchasing film through the school at $2.00 per role. Video editing will be introduced.


Photography II 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Photography I


Students must have their won 35mm camera. Students will extend their knowledge of photo manipulation through use of scanners and software. Video editing will be expanded upon.


Graphic Design 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


This course will incorporate advertising, fashion, architectural. The computer as well as hand drawn work will be included.

BUSINESS


Advanced Keyboarding, Typewriting and Formatting B210 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9,10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding, Typewriting and Formatting I & II


This course continues the development of skills from Jr. High Keyboarding, Production work typically includes letters, manuscripts, statistical tables and a variety of business forms. Students prepare office-related projects that are evaluated according to business standards. Excellent keyboarding skills should be developed.


Computer Concepts and Software Applications B221 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding, Typewriting and Formatting I


This course should develop students awareness and understanding of the application of electronic data processing concepts, software, and equipment to accomplish tasks typically performed by employees in the business, marketing and management occupational area. This course builds upon computer literacy concepts taught earlier in general education classes. Instruction focuses specifically on the use of software packages that form a core used by any person employed in a business, marketing or management occupation.
Students will be given the opportunity to view a variety of data processing systems and should have frequent hands-on experiences. Instruction will be given in the use of word processing, financial modeling, data-base management, business graphics, and communications software. Instruction will focus on problem analysis and ethical considerations that arise in using electronic data processing equipment and gaining access to available databases. Specific units of instruction include: Know the basic functions of a computer system; demonstrate equipment and related operational skills; use the computer for basic business applications such as word processing spreadsheets, date base, graphics and telecommunications.


Computer Applications 1 credit 1 year
Offered to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Computer Concepts


This course will focus on hands-on activities using word processing, database, spreadsheets, telecommunications and hypermedia. Students will become familiar with the operation of simple networks, web page design, power point presentations, and individual projects.


Office Technology 1 credit 1 year
Offered to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding I and II or Computer Concepts


This skill level course would prepare students for employment upon graduation. Emphasis is placed on office etiquette; proper business behavior; maintaining office equipment; performing clerical duties; organizing and planning; processing mail; receiving visitors, patients, or clients; coordinating and performing activities for the employer; telephone techniques; filing materials manually; maintaining office supplies and forms; performing telecommunications activities; performing financial activities; preparing written communications; machine transcription; supervising and training; and office equipment applications, as well as a review of grammar, punctuation, and business mathematics. Previously learned skills will be integrated with new skills by completing a series of realistic office assignments.


Business Journalism 1 credit 1 year
Offered to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Keyboarding and/or Computer Concepts


A combination class dealing in part with Business Communications, Business English, Journalism, and Computer Applications. The class will develop skills using Desk-Top publishing, Adobe Pagemaker, page set-up, graphics, input and storage of documents and files, editing and correcting documents, and the printing and distribution of output. These skills will be displayed by designing the school yearbook and a high school newsletter.

Accounting I B310 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


This course is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, and management. This course includes planned learning experiences that develop initial and basic skills used in systematically computing, classifying, recording, verifying and maintaining numerical data involved in financial and product control records including the paying and receiving of money. Instruction includes information on keeping financial records, summarizing them for convenient interpretation, and analyzing them to provide assistance to management for decision making. Accounting computer applications will be integrated throughout the course. In addition to stressing basic fundamentals and terminology of accounting, instruction will provide initial understanding of the preparation of financial reports, operation of related business machines and equipment, and career opportunities in the accounting field. Processing employee payrolls will also be included. Practice sets with business papers will be used to emphasize actual business records management.


Accounting II B430 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Accounting I


This course builds upon the foundation established in Accounting I. This course is planned to help students develop deeper knowledge of the principles of accounting with more emphasis being placed on financial statements and accounting records. It is a study of previously learned principles as they apply to the more complicated types of business organizations; partnerships, corporations, branches, etc. The students may become familiar with such specialized fields of accounting as cost accounting, tax accounting, payroll accounting, and others. Some students may choose to do specialized accounting computer applications, and others may elect payroll clerk, data processing computer applications. Simulated business conditions will be provided through the use of practice sets. Skills are developed in the entry, retrieval, and statistical analysis of business data using computers. This course provides a technical background for college-bound students who plan a business curriculum, as well as those who wish vocational preparation.


Business Principals and Management Introduction to Business) 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: none


Gives students an understanding of what is necessary to manage a successful business including the characteristics, environment, terminology, technology and financial management. Provides an awareness of business career opportunities from proprietorships to partnerships. Gives students an opportunity to look at businesses through field trips, guest speakers and the use of business simulation packets.


Record Keeping for Business 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Gives students a broad knowledge of businesses operations and the basic skills needed to keep better financial records. A step-by-step approach to every task used in basic record keeping will be explored. The class will use spreadsheets, Internet connections and automated accounting in the competition of the material.


Business Concepts (Consumer Education) 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisite: None

Required for Graduation

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the functioning of our private enterprise system and how it affects individuals as workers, consumers, and citizens. Consumer decisions must be based upon factual knowledge and the application of basic economic principles as well as one's own values and goals. Business communication concepts taught will focus on the students' abilities to read and interpret information as it applies to effective reading and writing skills needed in business procedures. Students will develop skills in business computations including keeping checkbooks, calculating salaries, taxes, investments, and related business and personal financial transactions. Helping students to become informed consumers and to understand their rights and responsibilities as consumers in society are among the goals of this course.

DRIVER EDUCATION


Driver Education 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to grades 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: As below
Required for Graduation


Student must be at least fifteen years of age and must have passed at least eight (8) full credit courses during the previous two (2) semesters before enrolling in Driver Education. (PE in high school, Band, Chorus, PE and nine (9) week courses in the Jr. High are not full credit courses).
This course is an introduction to driving with the end goal being to obtain an Illinois Driver's License. Concepts of the safe driving task.


ENGLISH

English I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9
Prerequisite: None
Required for Graduation


Students will increase their skills in literature, grammar/usage mechanics, language, composition and reading. The course includes units on novels, basic grammar, spelling, learning to write organized, coherent paragraphs and essays and Accelerated Reader.


English II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10
Prerequisite: English I
Required for Graduation


Students should increase their skills in literature, grammar/usage mechanics, language, composition and reading. The course includes units on the library, on reading improvement, basic grammar, learning to write organized coherent paragraphs and spelling rules.


English III 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11
Prerequisite: English II (or administrative approval)
Required for Graduation


English III consists of a survey of American literature focusing on poetry, short stories, and plays as well as a brief review of grammar and a writing program.


English IV 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisite: English III (no grade lower than a C without teacher or administrative approval)


This course consists of a writing program which builds the student to writing several
basic essays and a research paper and an English literature survey of various literary forms such as the epic, parable, drama, the sonnet and other poetry forms, the short story and the novel.


Drama/Speech 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: English I


Drama/Speech is a course to develop speaking and performance skills. The course
focuses on reading plays, performing plays, Reader's Theater, culminates in the student's writing, directing and acting in their own movie. The student's will give informative, persuasive, demonstrative and entertainment speeches.

Literature (Mysteries) 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to: 11, 12
Prerequisite: English I and II


This class will require reading both in and out of the class. The class will cover all types of mysteries. Authors will include: Agatha Christie, Arthur Conan Doyle, Albert Camus and several other well-known authors. Students in the class will be required to actively participate in class discussion and write papers critiquing and discussing the mysteries read in class. Each student will also be required to read a mystery outside of class and write their own book review on that novel.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES
(Home Economics)


Foods and Nutrition H210 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


This course includes both classroom and laboratory experiences needed to develop knowledge and understanding of food principles and applied nutrition for all ages. During first semester (Foods I), the course content focuses on the tools and equipment used in cooking, safety and sanitation, food facts and fallacies, buying and storing food, and weight control and daily food needs. The second semester (Foods II) course content focuses on setting a table, the food pyramid, individual food groups, and foods around the world.


Food Services and Management H311 2 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12 (offered alternating years )
Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition


This course is designed to introduce students to the planning, purchasing, preparing and serving of food in quantity. Opportunities will be provided for students to practice a variety of preparation and serving techniques. Course content focuses on safety and sanitation, quality control, nutrition, commercial terminology, menu planning and the techniques of preparing food in quantity. Arrangements for serving some of the foods produced by the class to groups are included in the plans.

Clothing and Textiles I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Fee: Must purchase required materials including sewing supplies, fabric, polyester fiber-fill, etc.


This course includes both classroom and laboratory experiences need to develop knowledge and understanding of clothing and textile principles and techniques. The laboratory course content focuses on sewing safety, terms, tools and equipment, parts and functions of a sewing machine, understanding how to read and follow a pattern envelope and guide sheet, and basic sewing construction techniques. The classroom course content focuses on fibers, yarns, fabrics, finishes, caring for clothing, garment styles, labeling, color tones, and consumer rights and responsibilities in the clothing and textiles area.


Clothing and Textiles II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Clothing I
Fee: Must purchase required materials including sewing supplies, fabric, polyester fiber-fill, etc.


This course includes both classroom and laboratory experiences. A great deal more sewing techniques will be applied as many projects will be constructed. Students enrolled will be thoroughly trained on the use of the Baby Lock Embroidery machine and be required to do the work as orders come in.


Human Growth and Development H351 1 credit 1 year
(Child Development and Parenting)
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


This course is a combination course. The first semester being child development and the second semester being parenting. This course emphasizes learning experiences, which help students gain knowledge and understanding of the intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development of children from conception through adolescence. Course content focuses on conception, contraception, prenatal care, delivery and postnatal care of the baby and mother, health and safety of children, and exceptional children. The responsibilities and the skills needed to be a quality parent are also stressed throughout this course.


Child and Day Care Services Occupations H370 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12 (offered alternating years)
Prerequisite: Human Growth and Development


This course is designed to provide students interested in a career in child and day care operations with information and practical experiences needed for the development of job-related competencies. Students will be responsible for opening and operating their own child care center. Course content focuses on many of the same areas as human growth and development, but in a more in-depth form. State and local regulations governing childcare centers will be reviewed.


Adult Living 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: None


This course focuses on skills for living. Decision making skills will be emphasized along with the ability to recognize and accept the consequences of decisions. Financial resources, insurance, housing, relationships, parenthood, healthy life styles and career preparation will be addressed along with informing students of their rights and responsibilities as consumers.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE


Spanish I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Spanish I is a course to develop skills in speaking, writing, reading and understanding Spanish at a beginners level. The student learns vocabulary, grammar and some of the cultural background of Spanish speaking countries.


Spanish II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Spanish I


Spanish II continues with grammar and vocabulary at a more advanced level.


Spanish III 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: Spanish II


Spanish III is a more intense development and usage of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students will be introduced to Spanish and Latin American cultures.


Spanish IV 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisite: Spanish III


Spanish IV will be a continuation of Spanish III. The student will become more comfortable with Spanish as a second language.


HEALTH and PHYSICAL EDUCATION


Health 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: None
Required for Graduation


Introduction to health concepts in the following topic areas: Personal Health (diseases, reproduction, alcohol, drugs, first aid, nutrition) and Public Health (disease control, pollution, ecology, consumer health, public health problems).


Physical Education 1/4 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None Required


Participation which includes dressing out, participating, and passing tests in this class is required unless a current medical excuse or PE waiver is on file in the high school office. PE waivers may be granted on a semester basis in accordance with the laws of the state of Illinois.


MATHEMATICS


Integrated Math I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11
Prerequisite: None


Integrated Math I covers the same concepts of Algebra and Geometry, but in a combined approach. Students are involved in explorations and activities using technology to help students make cross-curricular and real-life connections. This is the first of a two-year course sequence. The course will be equivalent to an Algebra credit.


Integrated Math II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Integrated Math I or Algebra I


Integrated Math II continues topics covered in Integrated Math I. Students will further investigate Algebra and Geometry concepts and their connections. This course will be equivalent to a Geometry credit.


Geometry 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra I


Geometry is the study of points, lines, plane figures and their relationship in 2 and 3 dimensions. Connection to and application in the real world are seen throughout the course. Logical reasoning from basic definitions and axioms to more complex theorems is emphasized. This course is recommended for students planning to attend college.


Algebra II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry or Integrated Math I and II


Algebra II is an advanced course in Algebra. Many topics covered in Algebra I are covered here in more detail. New topics include quadratic equations with nonrational solutions, exponential, complex numbers, and radical equations. Algebra II prepares the student for more advanced study in Analytic Geometry and Trigonometry and/or college. This course is recommended for students planning to attend college.


Analytic Geometry 1/2 credit 1 semester

Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisites: Algebra II


This class will primarily focus on analytic geometry functions, higher degree polynomials, and logarithms. This course is recommended for students planning to attend college.


Trigonometry 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisites: Algebra II


This class covers trigonometry and other topics in algebra as time allows. This course is recommended for students planning to attend college.


Senior Math 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisites: Analytic Geometry, Trigonometry


This course covers probability and statistics. The text is a college book that incorporates mathematical theory and practical application using real world problems and statistical information.


Business Mathematics 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: 2 years High School Math


Business Math builds and strengthens basic math skills in personal and business math . Real-world and career applications are integrated throughout the course.


MUSIC


Band 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Enjoy music and willingness to participate. Previous experience in Jr. High band is preferred but not required.


This course will help improve the development of group and individual capabilities. Band at the high school level is geared toward performance. The high school band may perform at football games, basketball games, music festivals, and concerts.


Chorus 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Enjoy music and a willingness to participate.


This course will help improve the development of group and individual capabilities. Chorus at the high school level is geared toward performance. The chorus performs at Senior Citizen Center, Nursing Home, music festivals and concerts. Contest work is available.


SCIENCE


General Science 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 9, 10

Prerequisite: None

Required


General Science is designed to cover the fields of Chemistry and Physics with a strong emphasis on the practical aspects of each. As the technology in our lives grows more complex the average citizens find themselves presented with an opportunity to use knowledge of these areas. Current event topics are inserted when relevant. This is course is required for students planning to take Chemistry or Physics. (2 credits in science are required for graduation. General Science and/or Biology I must be taken by Freshmen.)


Biology I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11
Prerequisite: None

Required

Biology I is a required introductory course dealing with all living forms of life. Some lab work is required such as spring water quality, fish sampling, microscope usage and simple dissection of preserved animals. (2 credits in science are required for graduation. (Freshman must take either Physical Science or Biology I)


Biology II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grade: 12 (or administrative approval)
Prerequisite: Biology I


Biology II is a college-prep course in human anatomy and physiology. All systems of the human body are covered in detail. During the last 9 weeks the students will dissect fetal pigs and a cadaver will be observed during 2nd semester. This is an excellent course for college bound seniors or anyone planning on becoming a nurse.


Chemistry I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Physical Science or Biology I


Chemistry is essentially a college-prep course that includes lab work and technical writing. Students gain knowledge that would be useful for such areas as health care occupations, agriculture, manufacturing and consumer resources.


Chemistry II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grade: 12 (or administrative approval)
Prerequisite: Chemistry I


Chemistry II is an advanced course in which students refine and increase their repertoire of lab skills and broaden their knowledge, including an introduction to organic chemistry. This course is particularly useful for students who are considering going into a health care profession, engineering or a science-based field.

Physics 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Algebra, Physical Science


Physics is the study of energy. The course covers a variety of topics including laws of motion, thermodynamics, optics, electricity, radioactivity and electronics. The course is considered college-prep, and students need to have a solid grasp of algebraic problem solving.


SOCIAL STUDIES


World History 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


World History has an extensive scope from pre-historic man to the post-1945 period and selects from world political, economic, and cultural events. There are key themes in world development which allow students to understand and analyze the similarities and differences among many civilizations that have developed in different parts of the world. Earliest civilizations, Asia, Africa, Europe, and North and South America have key themes that weave with the latest developments in each of these regions and the world today. An integrated understanding of the world today as a result of events in the past is the key of this course.

US History I 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: US History I


Required for Graduation
It will also cover many aspects of the local, state, and national government. The Illinois Constitution test and the US Constitution test, both requirements for graduation, will be administered during this class.


US History II 1 credit 1 year
Offered to Grades: 12
Prerequisite: None

Required for Graduation


This required course continues where US History I concludes. US History II is a survey of US history from its European background to the present. It is designed to impart an understanding of the cause and effect relationships of American history as well as the heritage and development of our present-day political, social, and economic institutions.


Sociology 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Sociology is an elective course. It examines people and human society. It also examines patterns of human organization as they have developed under changing circumstances.


Economics 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None

Economics is an elective course.


World Geography 1 credit 1 year

Offered to Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Geography is the study of our physical environment and its impact on history and life styles. This course will be a hands-on course rather than a book course with emphasis on map skills. Another emphasis will be country location and points of interest within the country. We will also watch the media to see what is happening in the geographical region as we are studying it.


Street Law 1/2 credit 1 semester
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


Business/Street Law is a course designed to provide students with the ability to analyze, evaluate, and resolve legal disputes. The text uses case studies, mock trials, role-plays, small group exercises and visual analysis activities. It also encourages the use of local community resource people to develop the knowledge and skill necessary for survival in our law-saturated society. The text covers such areas as Law and the Legal System, Consumer Law, Torts, Family Law, Housing Law, Criminal Law and Juvenile Justice.


History of Illinois 1/2 Credit 1 semester
Offered to Grades: 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: None


This class will trace the history of Illinois from the prehistoric Indians to the modern shapers of Illinois destiny. Discussion will include Indian cultures, the French, the English, the settlers and the immigrants, all who played a part in the story of Illinois.

EXPANDED CURRICULAR OFFERINGS FACS 1 credit 1 year


Courses are available through the Fulton Area Vocational System at various locations in the county. See the counselor for specific course and program offerings.


Online/ Dual Credit Courses 1/2 credit 1 semester


Online and Dual Credit courses may be available through Spoon River College and Carl Sandburg College.


Students are responsible for expense of these courses. A list of course will be made available to those who are interested and qualify.

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE OFFERINGS


The following courses are offered only to students who have been found eligible for special education as a result of a full-case study and are determined to need an alternative learning environment in accordance with an IEP.
English 1, 2, 3, 4
Math 1, 2, 3
Science 1, 2
Life Skills 1, 2
American History 1
American History 2 (will contain the necessary constitution tests for graduation)
Health - R
Consumer Ed - R
Working Life Skills 4